Tour of the Defenses of Washington DC

Tour – Historic Civil War Defenses of Washington DC

Historic Tour of the Defenses of Washington DC

One never knows what one will find if you rummage around the United States' attic...
Fort Ward Gate Alexandria Virginia
Fort Ward Gate
Alexandria Virginia
Driving around the "DMV" - District, Maryland & Virginia - one will often see signs of the US Civil War -  National Park Service signs that announce a fort such as Fort Davis or Fort Foote or Fort Totten with little but a few earthworks mounds to see and hardly any sign of what was there over 150 years ago.  Yet by the end of the war, there would be 68 forts along with some 90 artillery batteries that would be the defense of the perimeter of the Capital City of Washington DC.  Major General John G. Barnard was the engineer who designed most of these fortifications. He is often called the "Father of the Defenses of Washington DC".
Fort Stevens Washington DC
Fort Stevens
Washington DC
  Today, only a few of those fortifications and artillery batteries still exist in more than just those signs and mounds of earth -  Fort Stevens in Washington DC and Fort Ward in Alexandria, Virginia are two that have been conserved in entirety or partially to show part of  the Defenses of Washington DC.

National Park Service Presents a Tour

It was 1938, the 75th anniversary of the battle of Gettysburg during the US Civil  War.  It was when the Civil War was something fresh in the minds of the people who experienced it,  the National Park Service provided a tour of "the Defenses of Washington DC"  From that tour here is a twenty page booklet that was provided to those who took the tour. (Be patient - the book may take a bit to load)
The book "Images of America - Fort Myer" contains over 200 historical photographs.  They were selected from new research among the archives of America.  An autographed / personalized copy is available.   Order yours TODAY!
Arlington Heights - Defenses of Washington DC

Defenses of Washington DC During the Civil War

Arlington Heights - Defenses of Washington DC
Some Forts of Arlington Heights Virginia

Defending the Capital - Forts & Batteries

Few people know about the extensive Defenses of Washington.  By the end of the US Civil War, Washington DC was the most fortified and protected city in the world.  Nearly 70 forts and 90 artillery batteries surrounded the perimeter of the US Capital.  For if one would consider that it was an island among those who had rebelled with the states of Virginia seceding and Maryland remaining a slave state.   These Defenses of Washington are noted by a Commonwealth of Virginia historical marker and complemented by other historical markers erected by the Commonwealth  and the US National Park Service and localities. On the southern side, Arlington House was used as the headquarters.   It would be here that General Amiel Weeks Whipple and President Abraham Lincoln would often meet to have lunch and the President get the briefing while wrapping his arms around Whipple's two sons. When the war first began in earnest with the bombardment and siege of Fort Sumter in Charleston, South Carolina harbor,  Major Robert Anderson surrendered the fort to the Confederates.   Back in Washington DC, the Union Army soon went across the Potomac River and occupied the high ground of Arlington Heights (also known as part of the Custis-Lee estate) and quickly built fortifications at both Long Bridge (Fort Runyon) and Aqueduct Bridge (Fort Corcoran) to stop any invasion across those river crossings.  It was thought then to be sufficient protection, until the Battle of Bull Run. Fort Cass, a lunette, had been built on Arlington Heights as a defense from an attack from the west. After the Union Loss at the First Battle of Bull Run, the US Army leadership convened and decided to augment the perimeter defenses.   General George B McClellan would designate where and General John Gross Barnard would design and oversee the construction of the fort. It would be 1863 before the fort that would ultimately become Fort Myer would be built.  Fort Whipple was built on the most Northeastern part of Arlington Heights overlooking  Washington DC.  Designed by General Barnard, it was considered an outstanding design for a fort.  Placement was determined where General Amiel Weeks Whipple had ordered an observation balloon aloft to recon what the Confederates were doing to the west. An excellent map of the Defenses of Washington has been produced by the US National Park Service showing the sites and which locations are managed by the NPS. Additional reading about the Defenses of Washington and the battle of Fort Stevens is presented by The Civil War Trust During the Civil War the City of Alexandria Virginia was a center of activity for the Union.  Since then the city has done a fine job to preserve and present its Civil War heritage with the restoration and preservation of Fort Ward with a museum and the more recent effort to construct the Civil War Bike Trail with the cooperation of Arlington and Fairfax Counties in Virginia. Images of America - Fort Myer tells the story of the one and only remaining active fort from the Defenses of Washington.  Over 200 historical photographs are included in the book. Another book which details all the defenses - the forts and batteries with maps, photos from private collections is the revised version of Mr Lincoln's Forts that is written by Benjamin Franklin Cooling and Walton Owens.   Another interesting read is the book just published in November 2011 is Civil War Northern Virginia 1861 (The History Press) (Civil War Sesquicentennial) written by William S. Connery.