Browsing articles tagged with "Amiel Weeks Whipple Archives - Historic Fort Myer VIRGINIA"
Jun
5

Happy Birthday Fort Myer – Defending the Capital for 150 Years

hq ft myer 150x150 Happy Birthday Fort Myer   Defending the Capital for 150 YearsBeginning as Fort Whipple in 1863 as one of the Defenses of Washington, Fort Myer continues today in its original mission of defending Washington DC. Fort Marcy may have a sign on the George Washington Parkway… Fort Stevens has been partially reconstructed and preserved as is Fort Ward. But ONLY Fort Myer continues to defend with the celebrated Oldest Infantry Regiment in the US Army – the 3d — The Old Guard.

The acres have changed much in those century and a half. The drill field where hundreds of horses with mounted riders rode, kicking up dust or where the Wright Flyer flew overhead, the rustic trails where the troopers practiced their saber charge and trenches were dug to train for WW I and later where the Jeep from Bantam Car Company was tested and approved, are gone.

Where Rodney retired and a tribute to the US Army Remount Service was made with the movie “Keep ‘Em Rolling” – The first commercial movie filmed on Fort Myer, including the first instance of “caisson drag racing” on the drill field.

chapel arlington cantonment 150x114 Happy Birthday Fort Myer   Defending the Capital for 150 YearsSouth Post – Fort Myer where during WW II nearly 2000 WACs (Women’s Army Corps) lived and a complement of Soldiers who worked in the newly built Pentagon. Also the site of the “Troop Chapel” dedicated by Chief of Staff George Marshall – and then was duplicated 500 times across the US Army. The Military Police school called South Post home from the beginning.

US Army units that have called Fort Myer home have included numerous Cavalry Regiments – Capped off by the 3d - “Brave Rifles” and squadrons of the 9th and 10th – The “Buffalo Soldiers”. Home to the Signal Corps School where General Albert J Myer continued the use of the acres after the Civil War was over to teach the wig-wag system of signaling as well as the heliograph. The National Weather Service was born and developed on these historic acres with the needs promoting the exploration into aerial flight.

Alexander Graham Bell’s invention saw its first use among the US Army Signal Corps as the first long distance line ran between Fort Myer and their headquarters across the Potomac in Washington.

The mark of Patton … among each of his tours on Fort Myer,  General George S. Patton, Jr., he left an imprint that affected the US Army old post chapel 142x150 Happy Birthday Fort Myer   Defending the Capital for 150 Yearsand or the Post, from the Society Circus, to the iconic “Old Post Chapel”  - the design borrowed by the US Navy.   Patton Hall, known to most as “the O Club” is a standing tribute recognizing his contributions to Fort Myer.

Even the US Navy left an imprint upon the acres when it erected the first radio towers, “The Three Sisters” which enabled communication with the fleet and capability to communicate with Europe and across the United States.

Fort Myer is home to the US Army Band “Pershing’s Own” since the 1940s.  The other long time resident unit is the 3d Infantry Regiment, “The Old Guard”.   Together. they form a partnership to perform all the ceremonial duties and events within the National Capital Region – the most honorable among those duties and events is the support for the final honors at Arlington National Cemetery.

Whipple, Myer, Patton, Marshall, Pershing are only a few of the names that are among those who over the years set their mark on the Arlington Heights acres.

Happy Birthday Fort Myer!

PS …  You too can own an autographed copy of the book “Images of America – Fort Myer” … The First Book About this Historic US Army Post.  It contains over 200 “timeless historic photographs” which chronicle the first 100 years of the Post.made in usa 150x150 Happy Birthday Fort Myer   Defending the Capital for 150 Years

Apr
30

150th Anniversary – Chancellorsville – Beginning of the End of Whipple

Hugh Judson Kilpatrick   Chancellorsville Campaign 150th Anniversary   Chancellorsville   Beginning of the End of Whipple

Battle of Chancellorsville

After the Battle of Fredericksburg, General Amiel Weeks Whipple along with his command moved onto Chancellorsville…  sadly, it would be the beginning of the end for the dear General.  Of note it would also be the end of Lee’s favorite General, Stonewall Jackson, lost to “friendly fire” – few would know about Whipple.

For many months, General Whipple as the commander of the southern Defenses of Washington was nestled inside the confines of Washington DC with Arlington House as his headquarters.  A frequent visitor was Abraham Lincoln, who would come and have lunch with Whipple at the Custis-Lee mansion overlooking the nation’s capital.

That all ended when Whipple took a command and headed south.  His future as a commander was short lived as Chancellorsville continued the lost of life that began at Fredericksburg.  Whipple escaped the carnage that the Confederates inflicted on the advancing Union army.  Despite the wave after wave of Union soldiers crossing the Rappahannock River. with the Confederate position on Marye’s Heights, all of which were repulsed with heavy losses.  General Whipple was not among those lost at this battle.

It would be “Lee’s Best Battle”  where General Whipple, while supervising the building of a salient, would become the target of a Confederate sharpshooter.   The bullet would hit the General in the abdomen, mortally wounding him.  He was rushed back to Washington, DC, where he passed a few days later.  Lincoln would attend his funeral as a friend.  He also made plans to assure that General Whipple’s two sons were taken care of appropriately.  Both would be assured of appointments to become military officers.  Charles William was readily assured, having reached age of appointment, by the May 13, 1863 note from Lincoln to General Totten.   The note appears in the book, Images of America – Fort Myer, as it was discovered during the research for the book at the National Archives.

Apr
6

KINDLE VERSION – SOON!

FORT MYER front cover cropp 150x150 KINDLE VERSION   SOON!

Images of America
Fort Myer

It’s coming… the kindle version …  the book “Images of America – Fort Myer” is in the queue to be converted and released in  the Kindle  KINDLE VERSION   SOON!
version.   Arcadia Publishing has sent an alert that it will be available soon.   Watch this space for an announcement of its availability.  Historic Fort Myer began in 1863 as Fort Whipple, one of the nearly 70 forts that formed the Defenses of Washington.  Since the 1940s, it’s been the home of The US Army Band “Pershing’s Own” and the 3d Infantry Regiment, “The Old Guard”  (named by General Winfield Scott).

For those of you who still prefer a paper copy – especially if you would like an autographed copy –  it’s time to head to  BUY THE BOOK and select your choice.

In either case, you’ll be presented with over 200 timeless photographs complemented by interpretive text that will capsule the first one hundred years of this US Army Post –  1860s to 1960s.   It is the only remaining fort from the Civil War era that is still “ON POINT” – it’s also where the famed Buffalo Soldiers – the 9th and 10th Cavalry had squadrons posted twice.   And forgotten ways of transportation – the trolley lines – one which began as a horsecar that came out of Rosslyn , Virginia and ultimately electrified was extended to Nauck area of Arlington County, Virginia.

So whatever version you choose, the kindle version or the regular paper book, you’ll be getting an excellent book that presents such historic events such as: the first military aviation flight, the showcase for the US Cavalry, the little known “Society Circus” – begun during Patton’s second of four postings to  Fort Myer, impressive photos of  the South Post of Fort Myer,  the “Fort Myer and Arlington National Cemetery” connection and most of all the first time published note from Abraham Lincoln which was discovered during the research for the book.

 

Don’t have a Kindle yet?    Here’s where you can get one direct from Amazon…

   want to know when the Kindle version is available?   Sign up below …  provide your name and email address and you’ll be alerted.

Mar
31

ARMY Magazine Reviews the Book

By John Michael  //  News  //  No Comments

ARMY Magazine Cover April20 150x150 ARMY Magazine Reviews the Book

ARMY Magazine -
April 2013

 

 

It came as a pleasant surprise.  In the April 2013 issue of ARMY Magazine, the premier publication of the Association of the US Army, there was  a review of  “Images of America – Fort Myer.”

read more

Dec
11

Lincoln – Whipple Connection

 

expand lincoln01 150x150 Lincoln   Whipple Connection

It was an honor to present to The Lincoln Group of Washington DC and provide them an insight to The Lincoln – Whipple Connection…

General Amiel Weeks Whipple and President Abraham Lincoln had a great
friendship that most people are unaware.

Whipple was summoned East when the US Civil War broke out and became assigned to General McDowell’s staff as an engineer.   His career continued to rise from the major accomplishments this move initiated.

More will be shared on the Lincoln – Whipple connection in 2013.

In the meantime a hats off and thank you to the Lincoln Group for having me address their distinguished group!

Feb
15

Defenses of Washington DC During the Civil War

Arlington Heights 300x240 Defenses of Washington DC During the Civil War

Some Forts of Arlington Heights Virginia

Few people know about the extensive Defenses of Washington.  By the end of the US Civil War, Washington DC was the most fortified and protected city in the world.  Nearly 70 forts and 90 artillery batteries surrounded the perimeter of the US Capital.  For if one would consider that it was an island among those who had rebelled with the states of Virginia seceding and Maryland remaining a slave state.   These Defenses of Washington are noted by a Commonwealth of Virginia historical marker and complemented by other historical markers erected by the Commonwealth  and the US National Park Service and localities. On the southern side, Arlington House was used as the headquarters.   It would be here that General Amiel Weeks Whipple and President Abraham Lincoln would often meet to have lunch and the President get the briefing while wrapping his arms around Whipple’s two sons.

When the war first began in earnest with the bombardment and siege of Fort Sumter in Charleston, South Carolina harbor,  Major Robert Anderson surrendered the fort to the Confederates.   Back in Washington DC, the Union Army soon went across the Potomac River and occupied the high ground of Arlington Heights (also known as part of the Custis-Lee estate) and quickly built fortifications at both Long Bridge (Fort Runyon) and Aqueduct Bridge (Fort Corcoran) to stop any invasion across those river crossings.  It was thought then to be sufficient protection, until the Battle of Bull Run.

Fort Cass, a lunette, had been built on Arlington Heights as a defense from an attack from the west. After the Union Loss at the First Battle of Bull Run, the US Army leadership convened and decided to augment the perimeter defenses.   General George B McClellan would designate where and General John Gross Barnard would design and oversee the construction of the fort.

It would be 1863 before the fort that would ultimately become Fort Myer would be built.  Fort Whipple was built on the most Northeastern part of Arlington Heights overlooking  Washington DC.  Designed by General Barnard, it was considered an outstanding design for a fort.  Placement was determined where General Amiel Weeks Whipple had ordered an observation balloon aloft to recon what the Confederates were doing to the west.

An excellent map of the Defenses of Washington has been produced by the US National Park Service showing the sites and which locations are managed by the NPS.

Additional reading about the Defenses of Washington and the battle of Fort Stevens is presented by The Civil War Trust 

During the Civil War the City of Alexandria Virginia was a center of activity for the Union.  Since then the city has done a fine job to preserve and present its Civil War heritage with the restoration and preservation of Fort Ward with a museum and the more recent effort to construct the Civil War Bike Trail with the cooperation of Arlington and Fairfax Counties in Virginia.

Images of America – Fort Myer tells the story of the one and only remaining active fort from the Defenses of Washington.  Over 200 historical photographs are included in the book.

Another book which details all the defenses – the forts and batteries with maps, photos from private collections is the revised version of Mr Lincoln’s Forts Defenses of Washington DC During the Civil War that is written by Benjamin Franklin Cooling and Walton Owens.   Another interesting read is the book just published in November 2011 is Civil War Northern Virginia 1861 (The History Press) (Civil War Sesquicentennial) Defenses of Washington DC During the Civil War written by William S. Connery.

Feb
1

Virginia Festival of the Book

By John Michael  //  News  //  No Comments

VA Book Festival 2012 Virginia Festival of the Book DATELINE – Charlottesville Virginia: “Images of America – Fort Myer” has been selected as one of the books to be featured at this annual March 2012 event. From a field of nearly 1,000 books submitted, it was selected.

Author John Michael will be onsite to present and discuss his ground-breaking first book about this unique US Army Post with origins during the US Civil War as part of the Defenses of Washington, when it was named Fort Whipple

Fort Whipple was built in JUNE 1863 on Arlington Heights, Virginia within the acreage that was the Custis-Lee estate.   It was in honor of General Amiel Weeks Whipple who was the commander of the Defenses of Washington’s southern fortifications, who used Arlington House as his headquarters.

The Post was later renamed Fort Myer to eliminate the confusion with the other Fort Whipple located in Arizona and to honor General Albert J. Myer, the US Army’s first Signal Officer who located the US Army’s Signal Corps School on the acres.

Home to the US Army’s two elite units: The US Army Band – “Pershing’s Own” and “The Old Guard – 3d Infantry Regiment of the US Army,  Fort Myer continues to provide defense of Washington DC – the Capital of the United States of America.

More information about the event and times and locations within Charlottesville is at Virginia Festival of the Book 2012

Oct
21

Happy Birthday General Whipple

On 21 OCT 1817 in Concord, Massachusetts, Amiel Weeks Whipple was born to David Whipple, an innkeeper in Concord and Abigail Pepper, the daughter of Joseph Pepper, a Lieutenant in the American Revolution.

Whipple’s education included attending Concord’s schools and in 1836 entered Amherst College, then appointed to the US Military Academy at West Point where he graduated fifth in his class in JUN 1841.    Initially assigned to the First Artillery after his commissioning, he was transferred to the Topographical Engineers with assignments at Patapaco River, Maryland then New Orleans, Louisiana and Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

Various other assignments including the mapping of the route of the transcontinental railroad in western United States followed.   When the southern states began their secession, he was ordered to Washington DC where he would then map the densely wooded  Northern Virginia countryside.    His next assignment would be Chief Topographical Engineer for General McDowell.    His use of various methods of reconnaissance including the balloons promoted by Doctor Thaddeus K. Lowe was forward thinking.

arlington house 150x139 Happy Birthday General WhippleFor most of 1862,  then General Whipple commanded a division of the First Army Corps using Arlington House, the former residence of General Robert E. Lee as his headquarters.  It was then that the friendship of President Lincoln and the General continued to strengthen as Lincoln would drive over to Arlington House in the Presidential carriage and lunch with Whipple and afterwards as Lincoln wrapped his arms around Whipple’s two sons, would get the briefing from the General.

Looking to contribute more to the war effort, General Whipple applied for a combat role and was put in command of the 3d Division of III Army Corps participating in the battle of Fredericksburg in December 1862.   Later, in May 1863 he continued to command at the battle of Chancellorsville, when on 4 MAY he was mortally wounded by a sharpshooter.

Lincoln would later attend the funeral of General Whipple not as the President, but as a friend and would later write the note on 13 MAY 1863 to General Totten appointing William Whipple, the older son to West Point.  An image of the note, which was never seen before or even known about until it was discovered by John Michael is published and appears for the first time in the book “Images of America – Fort Myer” 

As the Defenses of Washington continued to be augmented with additional forts, one would be named for General Whipple – on Arlington Heights in the vicinity where he ordered a balloon aloft to gather intelligence.   That location, named Fort Whipple, would evolve and grow into present-day Fort Myer.

Sep
1

A note worthy find

LOC 3a52094r 244x300 A note worthy findWriting a book is a challenging project … finding information about the topic is also challenging … finding something to make it special is a key factor, but when you find something that’s rare and undiscovered, it makes the book outstanding!

Little did I know when I began the research for my book about Fort Myer, Virginia that I would discover a rare find – a note from Abraham Lincoln, which may have been tucked away since General Joseph G. Totten read it some nearly 150 years ago … or where and how I found it!

The first book about this historic US Army Post with origins during the US Civil War when it was known as Fort Whipple, “Images of America – Fort Myer” was published in June 2011 and on page 15 is Lincoln’s note that I found in the National Archives in College Park, Maryland.

Words couldn’t express my amazement when I discovered it or where and how I discovered it!

My research at the Archives was confined to the floor dedicated to still photographs.  Yet as I meticulously explored the contents of every box I requested, sandwiched between two photographs was a sheet protector containing what I first thought was a blank piece of paper … until I turned it over.  At the top it read:

Executive Mansion – Washington

The date

May 13, 1863

As I continued to read, the note (which was re-written on the 14th) appointed William Whipple, older son of General Amiel Weeks Whipple to West Point.  Recognizing the relationship, it quickly went onto the scanner to be included in the book.  I didn’t realize until much later how rare a find it was since no one really knew about the note or even its existence!

General Whipple was the commander of the Defenses of Washington – they were comprised of 70 forts which ultimately surrounded Washington DC during the US Civil War.  He used Arlington House as his headquarters.  According to other accounts located during the research of the book, President Lincoln would drive over to have lunch with General Whipple and afterward wrap his arms around Whipple’s two sons as he got the briefing.  This note combined with the research established that Lincoln did visit Arlington House during the Civil War and a friendship developed between him and General Whipple.

What I found at the National Archives made the book “Images of America – Fort Myer” outstanding.

By John Michael

Jul
23

Dear General Totten…

naraii Dear General Totten...While working on what would become “Images of America – Fort Myer”, I spent much of my time digging and sorting among the wonderful resources of the US National Archives in College Park, Maryland.

 The Archives are a vast storehouse of the United States historical items, some more important than others – all in all the location at College Park is only one in their network of “archives”    If you have the chance to visit the Maryland location and do any research, you’ll soon find that you can spend much of your life there pouring over the collections.

“Images of America – Fort Myer” contains over 200 historical photographs.  Many were found among the Signal Corps collection of still photographs stored at the Archives.  When one is presented a box of 50 to 100 photographs, where the selection may have only included one photo in the box,  it’s a wonder just what else is nestled within ….  That curiousity resulted in some outstanding finds of images that have never been published before.   It also resulted in finding for the first time ever a note written to General Joseph Totten by President Abraham Lincoln.  It was written about the older of the Whipple sons, William Whipple, who by virtue of the note was appointed to West Point.  Extending the branch of the Lincoln Legacy Tree that connected what would become first Fort Whipple and ultimately Fort Myer.

The note (which wasn’t supposed to be where it was found) was sandwiched between two photographs protected by a sheet protector.  It now appears for the first time in print on page 015 of the book.   The existence of the note combined with a second note also written about the Whipple sons, this one about the younger one, requested that he be appointed to the Naval Academy.

The contents of the first note appears below:

Executive Mansion

Washtington, DC

‘May 13, 1863 - 

May 14, 1863,

My dear Sir,

I wish to appoint William Whipple, son of the General  who fell in the recent battle on the Rappahonack, to West Point, next Spring, and I wish to file this as a remembrance for the subject.

Your truly,

A. Lincoln

 

Has anyone come across the second note?

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