Fort Robinson Post Headquarters

Fort Robinson – Cavalry Post & Remount Depot

Fort Robinson  Post Headquarters
Fort Robinson Post Headquarters
 

FORT ROBINSON -

GATEWAY TO THE WEST

It was in 1847 as America continued to push west.  The US Army established Posts on the frontier and Fort Robinson, Nebraska was one.  This post would have a very interesting life over the next several decades as a home for the US Cavalry including the famed Buffalo Soldiers. It then would become in the 20th century the largest of all the remount depots of the US Army's Remount Service. The thousands of acres - about  22,000 began as Camp Robinson named after Lieutenant Levi  Robinson. He was killed in February 1874 by a band of Indians who attacked the lieutenant and a Corporal   while they were on a side trip hunting game. The US Army Post later became the largest remount depot for the US Army Remount Service after the depot at Fort Keogh was closed
The book - "Images of America - Fort Myer" is HERE!

KINDLE VERSION – NOW!

Images of America - Fort Myer
Images of America
Fort Myer
It's here... the kindle version ...  the book "Images of America - Fort Myer" was in the queue to be converted and released for   the Kindle and the application for your tablet or Android phone version.   Arcadia Publishing has sent an alert that it's available now. Historic Fort Myer began in 1863 as Fort Whipple, one of the nearly 70 forts that formed the Defenses of Washington.  Since the 1940s, it's been the home of The US Army Band "Pershing's Own" and the 3d Infantry Regiment, "The Old Guard"  (named by General Winfield Scott). For those of you who still prefer a paper copy - especially if you would like an autographed copy -  it's time to head to  BUY THE BOOK and select your choice. In either case, you'll be presented with over 200 timeless photographs complemented by interpretive text that will capsule the first one hundred years of this US Army Post -  1860s to 1960s.   It is the only remaining fort from the Civil War era that is still "ON POINT" - it's also where the famed Buffalo Soldiers - the 9th and 10th Cavalry had squadrons posted twice.   And forgotten ways of transportation - the trolley lines - one which began as a horsecar that came out of Rosslyn , Virginia and ultimately electrified was extended to Nauck area of Arlington County, Virginia. So whatever version you choose, the kindle version or the regular paper book, you'll be getting an excellent book that presents such historic events such as: the first military aviation flight, the showcase for the US Cavalry, the little known "Society Circus" - begun during Patton's second of four postings to  Fort Myer, impressive photos of  the South Post of Fort Myer,  the "Fort Myer and Arlington National Cemetery" connection and most of all the first time published note from Abraham Lincoln which was discovered during the research for the book.   Don't have a Kindle yet?    Here's where you can get one direct from Amazon...     the Kindle version is available   ...
Images of America - Fort Myer

Why I Wrote the Book

Images of America - Fort Myer"Images of America - Fort Myer" became a reality on 13 JUN 2011, one day before the US Army's birthday - very appropriately mind you. As the FIRST BOOK ever about this historic US Army Post with origins back to the US Civil War when it was known as Fort Whipple and part of the nearly 70 forts which surrounded and defended the US Capital - "The Defenses of Washington". Fort Myer continues that duty uninterrupted until today from the heights of Arlington.  What's on the acres has changed.  There's no more drill field where the thundering hooves of the nearly 1,500 horses carried their Cavalry troopers or pulled their cassions with field artillery.   There's no more trolley line.  Instead it's the home of the elite units of the US Army. The reason I wrote the book? Besides breaking new ground, which has become my hallmark, especially within the last decade, it needed to be done. This fort has been the site of many events which have molded or changed the world around us, and no one is aware of it and those milestones and contributions, until now. With over two years of research based on a foundation of working and walking among the US military since 2000, the result is over 200 historical photographs which cover from the 1860s to the 1960s.   The book also fills a void in the US Army story and as one of those who bought the book said "You set the bar high and you jumped over it."   -  a nice critique for a first work. Thanks to General Albert J. Myer and his visionary initiatives, the fort continued to be used after the War Between the States as the home for the Signal Corps School.   It was later General of the Army Philip H.  Sheridan upon a petition to the US Congress turned it into a military reservation and showcase for the US Cavalry -  The Remount Service begun in 1909 and the Front Royal Depot from 1911 provided Fort Myer with a fresh source of horses to keep the Army moving. The US Army Remount Service also had depots at Fort Keogh in Montana, Fort Reno in Oklahoma and later Fort Robinson in Nebraska which was the largest - 22,000 acres!   THE Key item in the book is a note from Abraham Lincoln which I discovered during my research. Until I found it at the National Archives sandwiched between two photographs, no one, not even the Fort Myer historian knew of its existence. It opens up another branch of the Lincoln Legacy Tree and published for the first time in my book. Highlights of some of the milestones at Fort Myer include:
  • Birthplace of military aviation,
  • Birthplace of the National Weather Service,
  • Home of the US Army Signal Corps School,
  • The JEEP was tested and approved on Fort Myer,
  • Home of the US Army Band since 1942,
  • Home of The Old Guard since 1948
  • Society Circus (which I believe evolved into "Spirit of America") 
The impact that General George S. Patton had with his four tours on Post is amazing.   The book helps remember South Post Fort Myer which served strongly as where the WACS and 12th Infantry were located during World War II.   South Post also is where the MP School was established and a chapel was built that would be replicated over 500 times across the US Army (many of which are still providing a place of worship for the Soldiers, their family and friends.) (*The Soldiers of the  US Army's 3d Infantry Regiment who's dual mission includes defending the Capital and performing the ceremonial work in Arlington National Cemetery and around the Capital region including White House, Pentagon, Andrews AFB, etc.) The real treat are the over 200 historical photographs which chronicle over time the first one hundred years of this historic US Army Post.   Many of which have never been seen before or published. John Michael "Preserving the memories so others will remember..." ™
Letter

He Bought the Book

We were sent this message and here in his own words is the reaction to the book about Historic Fort Myer:
Recently I purchased a copy of John Michael's outstanding book, "Images of America: Fort Myer", where he is recounting the history of Fort Myer, Virginia, a military outpost, if you will, that is bathed in American Military history. His work is truly a mini-museum laid out before you on 127 pages, that are filled with photographs, and I mean priceless photographs, and reinforced with factual information relating to the chronological events that not only shaped America, but its Army. I couldn't begin to share with you all that I read and saw within the pages of the magnificent book, because I don't think I could do it it justice. John Michael has truly poured his heart into his prose, and I personally believe that if you are either a history buff, or a Soldier who has once served on this Post of Generals, this book needs to be in your library, with many a "dog eared" page.
Bernie Bernwall (Wilson) Author of "What Wouldn't Jesus Do?" And, And, veteran of The Old Guard of the US Army, 3d Infantry Regiment" Get a copy of Bernie's book from Amazon:
Abraham Lincoln

A note worthy find – Lincoln writings

Abraham LincolnWriting a book is a challenging project … finding information about the topic is also challenging … finding something to make it special is a key factor, but when you find something that’s rare and undiscovered, it makes the book outstanding! Little did I know when I began the research for my book about Fort Myer, Virginia that I would discover a rare find - a note from Abraham Lincoln, which may have been tucked away since General Joseph G. Totten read it some nearly 150 years ago … or where and how I found it! The first book about this historic US Army Post with origins during the US Civil War when it was known as Fort Whipple, “Images of America - Fort Myer” was published in June 2011 and on page 15 is Lincoln’s note that I found in the National Archives in College Park, Maryland. Words couldn’t express my amazement when I discovered it or where and how I discovered it! My research at the Archives was confined to the floor dedicated to still photographs.  Yet as I meticulously explored the contents of every box I requested, sandwiched between two photographs was a sheet protector containing what I first thought was a blank piece of paper … until I turned it over.  At the top it read:

Executive Mansion - Washington

The date
May 13, 1863
As I continued to read, the note (which was re-written on the 14th) appointed William Whipple, older son of General Amiel Weeks Whipple to West Point.  Recognizing the relationship, it quickly went onto the scanner to be included in the book.  I didn’t realize until much later how rare a find it was since no one really knew about the note or even its existence! General Whipple was the commander of the Defenses of Washington - they were comprised of 70 forts which ultimately surrounded Washington DC during the US Civil War.  He used Arlington House as his headquarters.  According to other accounts located during the research of the book, President Lincoln would drive over to have lunch with General Whipple and afterward wrap his arms around Whipple’s two sons as he got the briefing.  This note combined with the research established that Lincoln did visit Arlington House during the Civil War and a friendship developed between him and General Whipple. What I found at the National Archives made the book “Images of America - Fort Myer” outstanding.  Get your own autographed copy of the book now! By John Michael
National Archives- College Park Marylan

Dear General Totten…

National Archives- College Park MarylanWhile working on what would become "Images of America - Fort Myer", I spent much of my time digging and sorting among the wonderful resources of the US National Archives in College Park, Maryland. The Archives are a vast storehouse of the United States historical items, some more important than others - all in all the location at College Park is only one in their network of "archives"    If you have the chance to visit the Maryland location and do any research, you'll soon find that you can spend much of your life there pouring over the collections. "Images of America - Fort Myer" contains over 200 historical photographs.  Many were found among the Signal Corps collection of still photographs stored at the Archives.  When one is presented a box of 50 to 100 photographs, where the selection may have only included one photo in the box,  it's a wonder just what else is nestled within ....  That curiousity resulted in some outstanding finds of images that have never been published before.   It also resulted in finding for the first time ever a note written to General Joseph Totten by President Abraham Lincoln.  It was written about the older of the Whipple sons, William Whipple, who by virtue of the note was appointed to West Point.  Extending the branch of the Lincoln Legacy Tree that connected what would become first Fort Whipple and ultimately Fort Myer. The note (which wasn't supposed to be where it was found) was sandwiched between two photographs protected by a sheet protector.  It now appears for the first time in print on page 015 of the book.   The existence of the note combined with a second note also written about the Whipple sons, this one about the younger one, requested that he be appointed to the Naval Academy. The contents of the first note appears below:

Executive Mansion

Washtington, DC

'May 13, 1863 - May 14, 1863, My dear Sir, I wish to appoint William Whipple, son of the General  who fell in the recent battle on the Rappahonack, to West Point, next Spring, and I wish to file this as a remembrance for the subject.

Your truly,

A. Lincoln

Has anyone come across the second note?

With the Lincoln note included, consider getting your own copy of "Images of America - Fort Myer" -  A personalized - autographed copy of the book may be obtained - Buy the Book

The book - "Images of America - Fort Myer" is HERE!

It’s here…

The book - "Images of America - Fort Myer" is HERE! After months of anticipation, the book "Images of America - Fort Myer" is in the market.   Thank all of you who pre-ordered the AUTOGRAPHED copy of the book.   Your author autographed book ships TODAY! NOTE: You can still get an author autographed copy of the book... and it'll ship immediately!  Just go to  "BUY THE BOOK"  and click on the link.
Images of America - Fort Myer

A Look Inside the Book

After all this time - Wondering what's in the book?  Wonder no more ...  Images of America - Fort MyerAmong the pages are over 200 historical photographs from 1860s until the 1960s -combined with insightful information to complement them that unveils the telling story of this unique US Army Post -  the first 100 years  - its people, events and their impact on the US Army, the United States of America and the world.  The Table of Contents is below...
  1. Defend the Capital
  2. A New Name  and the Signal Corps School
  3. The Cavalry, the Signal Corps Returns and World War I
  4. Between the Wars
  5. World War II
  6. Showcase for the US Army and the Nation
One of the nice things that Amazon has done is to post a "Look Inside the Book" on their website - and to get there - Click on "Buy the Book" and go to the Amazon website to get a preview -  Page 15 has that unseen / unpublished note from Abraham Lincoln -  A FIRST!
Troopers from the 2d Squadron Brave Rifles - 3d Cavalry

Brave Rifles – The First “President’s Own”

Troopers from the 2d Squadron Brave Rifles - 3d Cavalry
"AI-EE-YAH!” the Regimental Battle Cry of the Brave Rifles announced their arrival...
It was 1919, World War I was over and those who went  "Over there..." began to return home to the United States.  The 3d Cavalry Regiment came home to Boston with Headquarters and 1st Squadrons moving onto Fort Ethan Allen in Vermont.
Fort Myer would then receive 3d Squadron, but it would be re-designated 2d Squadron when the 3d Squadron was deactivated.   Over the next two plus decades, the troopers of 2d Squadron would  defend the nation's capital and also be called upon to provide ceremonial support - honor guards and escorts for visiting dignitaries, final honors support within Arlington National Cemetery which earned them the title of the "President's Own" for their service.

Escort to First Unknown Soldier

In 1921 when the first unknown was laid to rest within Arlington National Cemetery near the amphitheater, the "Brave Rifles" provided the ceremonial escort.  It was the regimental bugler, Staff Sergeant Frank Witchey, who would sound TAPS at the ceremony.  Sentinels at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier were provided by the 3d Cavalry until 1941.

Display of Skills and Talents

"Brave Rifles" - Saddle Blanket Insignia
Saddle Blanket Insignia
Over the years while at Fort Myer, the troopers of the "Brave Rifles" would delight and entertain the residents of Washington DC with their excellent horsemanship skills and talents during horseshows, polo matches and  the Society Circus.  The latter  is an event that has evolved into today's Spirit of America hosted by the US Army and executed by the US Army's 3d Infantry Regiment - "The Old Guard" and The US Army Band - "Pershing's Own" within the Washington DC area and several US cities.
The "Brave Rifles" would ultimately relinquish their horses and leave Fort Myer in February 1942.  They would head to Georgia - Fort Ogelthorpe first then onto Fort Benning to get mechanized in preparation to deploy during World War II.
"Images of America - Fort Myer" which is based on over two years of research, contains over 200 historical photographs that presents the first one hundred years of this US Army Post with origins during the US Civil War when it was known as Fort Whipple.